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Henry James (Harry) Maynard (1876–1967)

This article was published:

Harry Maynard, caricature by Dick Ovenden, 1923

Harry Maynard, caricature by Dick Ovenden, 1923

Labor Call (Melbourne), 21 June 1923, p 8

Henry James (Harry) Maynard (1876-1967) bread carter and trade union official 

Birth: 9 December 1876 at Ballarat, Victoria, son of Henry George Maynard (1852-1920), an agricultural labourer, later a waiter, born at Crookham, Hampshire, England, and Mary Ann, née Dempsey (1851-1934), born in County Carlow, Ireland. Marriages: (1) 25 December 1896 at Fitzroy, Melbourne, to native-born Elizabeth Ellen Lucas (1877-1911). They had three daughters and three sons. (2) 7 May 1913 with Catholics rites at Brunswick, to native-born Florence Mabel Stirling (1895-1967). They had one son before they separated in 1915 and divorced in 1921. (3) 19 April 1924 at the Baptist manse, Collingwood, to native-born Elsie Victoria Maynard (1889-1965). Death: 12 July 1967 at Cheltenham, Victoria. 

  • His father left the family in 1880 and for a year Harry and his siblings were wards of the state before returning to the care of their mother.
  • In 1884 he moved with his parents and brothers to Sydney, NSW. The family returned to Victoria in 1888.
  • Harry first began work as a chemist’s assistant about 1891. He became a bread carter to gain more pay about 1892. Joined Melbourne and Suburban Bread Carters’ Association about 1893.
  • Executive member of Victorian branch from 1896, including vice-president in 1905 and president in 1906.
  • Secretary of the Bread Carters’ Union (BCU), Victorian State branch from 1906 until he retired in 1958.
  • Member of Bread Carters’ Wages Board 1908 to 1958. Federal secretary of the BCU from 1916 to 1958.
  • Represented members on royal commissions of Winneke, Gepp, Webber and Stretton investigating bread industry. Awarded Queen’s Coronation Medal for recognition of services to the trade union movement, 1954.
  • In his early years was vice-president of the Brunswick Labor League. Known affectionately in trade union circles as the ‘father of Trades Hall’.
  • Secretary to the Baking Trades Football and Cricket Councils, and of the Bread Carters Football and Cricket clubs.
  • Cause of death: cerebral haemorrhage, arteriosclerosis, senility and left hemiplegia.

Sources
Labor
, December 1956, August 1958.

Additional Resources

  • photo, Labor Call (Melbourne), 23 April 1914, p 19
  • profile, Labor Call (Melbourne), 21 June 1923, p 8

Citation details

'Maynard, Henry James (Harry) (1876–1967)', People Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, https://peopleaustralia.anu.edu.au/biography/maynard-henry-james-harry-33745/text42239, accessed 25 June 2024.

© Copyright People Australia, 2012

Harry Maynard, caricature by Dick Ovenden, 1923

Harry Maynard, caricature by Dick Ovenden, 1923

Labor Call (Melbourne), 21 June 1923, p 8

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Life Summary [details]

Birth

9 December, 1876
Ballarat, Victoria, Australia

Death

12 July, 1967 (aged 90)
Cheltenham, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Cause of Death

brain hemorrhage

Cultural Heritage

Includes subject's nationality; their parents' nationality; the countries in which they spent a significant part of their childhood, and their self-identity.

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