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John Randal Phillips (1795–1852)

by Xavier Reader, Diane Brunning and Jane Lydon

This article was published:

John Randal Phillips (1795-1852) [1] was an ‘agriculturalist’ and public official who emigrated to the Swan River colony (Western Australia) from England.[2] He was the son of George Phillips (c.1753-1817) and Mary Phillips, neé Lovell (1760-1804) and was born in Winterbourne, near Bristol, on 29 September 1795.[3]

John Randal’s paternal line originally hailed from the Bristol area until settling in Barbados sometime during the 17th century.[4] His father George divided his time between England and Barbados, receiving his education at Queen's College, Oxford, and later returned to Barbados in 1773 following the deaths of his parents.[5] John Randal’s maternal line, the ‘Lovells’ were also descended from an early English emigrant, Philip Lovell of Skelton, a merchant, who settled in Barbados in the 17th century.[6] John Randal’s mother Mary Lovell was baptised in Barbados in 1760, although further details of her early life remain unclear.[7]

Mary Lovell was George’s third wife. He first married Mary ‘Polly’ French (d. October 1777) on 6 February 1777 in London, and later married Sarah Lovell (1758-1783), on 14 February 1781, in Barbados.[8] George and Sarah had one child: Margaret Phillips (1781-1828), later Parsons, John Randal’s eldest (half) sibling.[9] Following Sarah’s death, George married Mary Lovell, his second wife’s younger sister, on 24 of April 1786 in Shoreditch, England.[10] The timing of the birth of their first child, Sarah Isabella (1786-1850), on 7 October 1786 confirms that Mary was over three months pregnant at the time of their marriage.[11] Sometime between April and November 1786 George returned to Barbados accompanied by his wife, as Sarah Isabella was baptised in the parish of St Michael, Barbados, as were many of John Randal’s other siblings: Mary Elizabeth (b.1788), John Randal (1789-1793—an older sibling of the same name who did not survive infancy), James Harris (1791-1793) and Georgiana (b.1793).[12] Following the deaths in 1793 of their two young sons and the birth of Georgiana, the family relocated to Winterbourne, a village north of Bristol, where John Randal and his youngest siblings, Ann Graeme (b.1797), and Jane Catherine (b.1800), were born and baptised.[13]

John Randal is recorded as receiving his formative education at a school run by his father in Frenchay, Bristol. [14] At the age of seventeen, John Randal began training as a lawyer. On 28 May 1813, he and his father signed articles of clerkship with Robert Baxter of Furnivals Inn, “one of the attornies [sic] of his Majesty’s court of Kings Bench,” a contract which bound John Randal to Baxter as a clerk for the following five years.[15]

The Phillips family amassed significant wealth, some of which was inherited by John Randal. This wealth was derived (at least in part) from the bequests of Phillips’ grandfather, also named John Randal Phillips (1724-1773).[16] This man may have also been the John Randal[l] Phillips who was a merchant of the ship ‘Britannia’, and was involved in the trade of tobacco and sugar, both products cultivated through enslaved labour.[17] Following his death in 1773, John Randal senior distributed his wealth amongst his immediate family, including to his son, George Phillips, the father of John Randal Phillips (junior).[18] Entries in George’s account book in the years following his father’s death include expenses and income relating to his Barbados properties and ownership of at least twenty-seven enslaved people.[19] George also purchased his own land in Barbados, where he constructed a “chaise house, stable and negroe houses [sic].”[20]

Following George’s death in 1817, his wealth was distributed amongst his children, including to his son John Randal. Whilst John Randal was bequeathed 450 guineas, his inheritance was greatly reduced after the payment of his father’s debts. [21] In 1830, John Randal also received a bequest of £1,500 from his aunt, Elizabeth Lovell (neé Osborne), which may have been derived from slavery.[22] According to his father’s will, he also received an additional sum from his grandmother, Margaret Lovell (neé Harris). The total amount he received from Margaret is unclear, however it had been reduced by £150, which his father had used to pay for John Randal’s admission into the solicitor’s office in 1813.[23] Although the source of part of John Randal’s wealth undoubtedly derived from profits of slavery, neither George Phillips nor his son John Randal Phillips (junior) appear to have received direct compensation from plantation or slave-owning interests.[24]

John Randal Phillips emigrated to the Swan River colony in 1829. It is not currently known how he was employed between 1817-1829 although it is possible that he spent some time in the West Indies, because he was identified by Albany settler George Egerton Warburton in 1841 as an “old West Indian.”[25] Departing aboard the Protector in October 1829 from London, Phillips arrived in the newly-established colony on 25 February 1830 as one of its first settlers.[26] Described as an “agriculturalist,” an early evaluation of his assets indicates he brought with him a total of £435, 17s, 1.5p to invest in the new colony, £195 of which was considered directly applicable to the cultivation of land, along with two letters of credit totalling a further £700.[27] According to the method of granting land based on the value of assets they introduced (set at 40 acres for every 3 pounds of investment), Phillips was entitled to claim 2,600 acres of land.[28] However, he was granted 6,600 acres of land, which was worth £300 more than his investment.[29]

Phillips claimed locations 13 and 14a on the Canning River, which he named ‘Maddington Park’, now the Perth suburb of Maddington.[30] Early on, his agricultural pursuits suffered delays as seeds were lost through Indigenous burning practices.[31] However, by September 1832, it was noted of his farm that the “crops [are] well got in, and the whole exhibiting a neat and farmer like appearance much more in the English style.”[32] Like most early settlers to the Swan River colony, Phillips mixed agriculture with pastoralism. He sold his Maddington Park land in July 1833, and moved to ‘Stoke Farm’, located further north on the Canning River, where, in addition to continuing his farming pursuits, he also established a flour mill.[33] Stoke Farm suffered significant losses in February 1841, when fire set by Noongar destroyed “the house and several out-buildings.”[34] The scale of his enterprise is evidenced by his sale of stock at the end of his farming career in December 1841, where he sold at auction 500 ewes, 400 goats, and several cows.[35]

Phillips’ farms were situated on the Traditional Country of the Noongar, causing persistent confrontation.[36] He was speared twice by Noongar, first in October 1830 and later in 1838.[37] In May 1833 Noongar leaders Midgegooroo and Yagan speared two of Phillips’ employees, Thomas and John Velvick, at Maddington Park, a property originally established by Phillips.[38] Later in the month, Goord-ap stole one of his rams, and was transported to Rottnest Island prison in 1837, becoming the first Noongar to be sentenced to incarceration ‘beyond the seas’.[39] In 1839, John Burtenshaw, a shepherd boy employed by Phillips, was also killed on his Canning River property.[40] On around fifteen separate occasions between 1833 and 1839, he lost stock to a total of 88 sheep, 100 goats, 46 turkeys and four horses, in addition to the loss of a quarter acre of potatoes and two flour bags, amounting to the value of £1,500.[41] As these incidents suggest, the Canning district was riven by colonial violence in these years, and in 1839 Phillips led a punitive expedition against the Noongar.[42] He was also present in many explorations designed to further expand farming and settlement in the region.[43]

Phillips held numerous civil positions in Western Australia. In February 1834, he was appointed as a Justice of the Peace, and by 1839 was appointed as the Governor’s Representative for Williams’ River, around 160km south-east of Perth.[44] He also participated in expeditions to expand settlement to the south, and was active in the colony’s emerging governance and development, including as a director of the Agricultural Society.[45] By 1840 he had moved south to the regional port town of Albany, where he became Resident Magistrate, immediately succeeding George Grey, later governor of both the Cape Colony and New Zealand.[46] In 1840 he was appointed Resident Magistrate for Albany, and therefore also the Collector of Customs, Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages and the Magistrate in the Local Court, Court of Petty Sessions and Licencing Court.[47] He also became the Chairman of the Court of General Sessions at Albany in July 1847, Sub-protector of ‘Natives’ for the Plantaganet District, and Government Resident of Albany.[48] By 1840, Phillips' many civil positions enabled him to retire from farming, and by December 1841, he had sold his Stokes Farm property and moved to Albany, which at the time, had a population of around 140.[49] He resigned as Government Resident in July 1847 and took up the position of Native Inspector.[50]

Phillips married Martha Jane (neé Smith), born 1809, on 1 August 1839, during the visit of Bishop Short to the Swan River Colony.[51] Mary had sailed with Phillips in 1829 to the Swan River colony as his servant, his only accompanying companion, aged twenty-one at the time.[52] Together, they had seven children: John Randall Junior (1832-1917), Georgiana (1833-1866), George Braithwaite (1836-1900), Mary Elizabeth (1837-1902), Henry Thomas (1839-1911), Margaret Parsons (for whom a death date has not been established) and Charles, who died within a year of his birth.[53]

John Randal Phillips died on 27 December 1852 from influenza, and was buried at the Albany Memorial Park Cemetery, although his grave is unmarked.[54] The Perth Gazette noted that “Mr Phillips’ loss will be very severely felt” by members of the community, and that his death marked the loss of “a valuable [government] officer.”[55] His wife Martha died in 1857 at Kanyaka Station, South Australia, of “disease of the heart,” aged forty-six. Kanyaka Station was being managed by their son, John Randall at the time.[56]

Endnotes 
[1] The authors are grateful to Tom Chapman, Wendy Chapman and Sally Grundy for their kind assistance with the compilation of this entry. See also Tom Chapman and Sally Grundy, ‘Speeches about John Randall Phillips and George Braithwaite Phillips’, State Library of Western Australia, ACC 9645AD/1: Synopsis of John Randall Phillips, 30 June 2017, purl.slwa. wa.gov.au/slwa_b5089179_1.pdf

[2] ‘John Randal, son of George Phillips,’ transcript of baptisms 1750-1799, register no. 5, Winterbourne Parish Records, Gloucestershire, Frenchay Museum Archives; ‘Ann Graeme Phillips,’ Church of England Baptisms, Winterbourne, Gloucestershire, 1797, Bristol Archives, P.Wi/R/1/e, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/imageviewer/collections/61666/images/47946_302022005560_4109-00021?treeid=&personid=&hintid=&queryId=91770fab5dcd9a5bf6da6c8b003628ba&usePUB=true&_phsrc=Gnd201&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true&pId=2199253; George Egerton-Warbuton, King Georges’ Sound, Albany to Emma Egerton Warburton, Chester (transcript from original privately held), 17th April 1841, ‘Egerton-Warburton Family Papers’, J S Battye Library, acc. 1179A, https://catalogue.slwa.wa.gov.au/record=b1679703~S2

[3] Will of George Phillips of Chiswick, Middlesex, 19 December 1817, Records of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, PROB 11/1599/284, The National Archives, Kew, UK, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D224627; ‘George Phillips Esquire,’ Burials, Parish of Saint George the Martyr, Middlesex, 1817, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/80163:5111?tid=&pid=&queryId=7076fd057f94e2e9329f64b6b93f67c2&_phsrc=Bmv276&_phstart=successSource; ‘Mrs Mary Phillips of Frenchay,’ Burials, Parish of Saint Michael, Gloucestershire, 1804, Bristol Archives, P/SG/R/1/c, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://search.ancestrylibrary.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=61687&h=2723735&tid=&pid=&queryId=f048ba0b7a58f5fbfdb7f0d7b76395e9&usePUB=true&_phsrc=Gnd223&_phstart=successSource

‘John Randal, son of George Phillips, transcript of baptisms 1750-1799, register no. 5, Winterbourne Parish Records, Gloucestershire, Frenchay Museum Archives, https://www.frenchaymuseumarchives.co.uk; ‘Collections,’ Daniel Parsons Collection, Downside Abbey Archives, acc. no. 1294.

[4] Tom Chapman and Sally Grundy, ‘Speeches about John Randall Phillips and George Braithwaite Phillips’, State Library of Western Australia, Acc. 9645AD/1: Synopsis of John Randall Phillips, 30 June 2017, purl.slwa. wa.gov.au/slwa_b5089179_1.pdf

[5] ‘Parsons of Barbados,’ in John Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland, vol. 2  M-Z (London: Henry Colburn Publishing, 1847), 1006; Diane Brunning, “If you really wish to be a gentleman, it is in your own power to make yourself one,” (MA paper, Bath Spa University, 2016), 1; Joseph Foster, Alumni Oxonienses: the Members of the University of Oxford, 1715-1866 (Oxford: University of Oxford, 1891), 1107.

[6] ‘Lovell of Skelton,’ in William Dugdale, The Visitation of the County of York, begun in 1665 and finished in 1666, vol. 36 (London: Surtees Society publishing, 1859), 157; Daniel Parsons, ‘Dugdale’s Visitation. 1665-66,’ in Notes and Queries: A Medium of Inter-Communication for Literary Men, General Readers, etc, series 4, vol. 1 (London: Oxford University Press, 1868), 216-7.

[7] ‘Mary Lovell, daughter of Philip and Margaret,’ Baptisms, Parish of Christchurch, Barbados, 1760, Barbados Church Records, film no. 004934437, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/454576:9788?tid=&pid=&queryId=b5de65e7a3440a9528a4bfeb3b465f11&_phsrc=Gnd210&_phstart=successSource

[8] ‘George Phillips and Mary French,’ Church of England Marriages and Banns,  All Saints, England, 1777, London Metropolitan Archives, P88/ALL1/025, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/7947788:1623?tid=&pid=&queryId=a73c721768717f607ac5eed455735b28&_phsrc=Gnd172&_phstart=successSource; ‘Mary Phillips,’ Burials, Parish of St Michael, Barbados, 1777, Barbados Archives, film no. 004934431; document certifying the marriage of George Phillips and Sarah Lovell on 14 February 1781, signed by the officiating minister of Christchurch, Barbados, ‘Collections’, Daniel Parsons Collection, Downside Abbey Archives, 1294; ‘Sarah Phillips,’ Burials, Parish of St Michael, Barbados, 1783, Barbados Archives, film no. 004934431.

[9] ‘Margaret Phillips,’ Baptisms, Parish of Saint Michael, Barbados, 1781, Barbados Archives, RL1/5, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/imageviewer/collections/61463/images/baptisms-0199?usePUB=true&_phsrc=Gnd203&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true&pId=13963; ‘Margaret Parsons,’ Burials, Parish of Stoke Gifford, Gloucestershire, 1828, Bristol Archives, EP/V/4/134, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://search.ancestrylibrary.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=61687&h=2723735&tid=&pid=&queryId=f048ba0b7a58f5fbfdb7f0d7b76395e9&usePUB=true&_phsrc=Gnd223&_phstart=successSource

[10] ‘George Phillips and Mary Lovell,’ Church of England Marriages and Banns, Parish of St Leonard, Shoreditch, 1786, P91/Len/A/01/Ms 7498/14, London Metropolitan Archives, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/1222426:1623?tid=&pid=&queryId=a4ccb1152f98a5f03a895f5526a0d4a4&_phsrc=Gnd179&_phstart=successSource

[11] ‘Sarah Isabella Phillips’, ‘Collections’, Daniel Parsons Collection, Downside Abbey Archives, 1294; ‘Sarah Isabella Phillips,’ Baptisms, Parish of Saint Michael, Barbados, 1786, Barbados Archives, RL1/5, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/imageviewer/collections/61463/images/baptisms-0213?usePUB=true&_phsrc=Gnd195&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true&pId=15019

[12] ‘Sarah Isabella Phillips’, ‘Collections’, Daniel Parsons Collection, Downside Abbey Archives, 1294; ‘Sarah Isabella Phillips,’ Baptisms, Parish of Saint Michael, Barbados, 1786, Barbados Archives, RL1/5, Ancestry.com Online Database; ‘Mary Elizabeth Phillips,’ Baptisms, Parish of Saint Michael, Barbados, 1788, Barbados Archives, RL1/5, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/imageviewer/collections/61463/images/baptisms-0216?usePUB=true&_phsrc=Gnd196&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true&pId=15285; ‘John Randall’ Baptisms, Parish of Saint Michael, 1789, Barbados Church Records 1637-1849, 004934431, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/277007:9788; ‘John Randal Phillips’, Burials, 1637-1887, Barbados Church Death Records, Findmypast Online Database, https://search.findmypast.co.uk/record/familysearchbrowse?id=https%3a%2f%2ffamilysearch.org%2fark%3a%2f61903%2f3%3a1%3a33sq-grsr-k2s%3fcc%3d1923399&recordmetadataid=fs_brb_1923399_d_imagepal; ‘James Harris Phillips,’ Baptisms, Parish of Saint Michael, Barbados, 1786, Barbados Archives, RL1/5, Ancestry.com Online Database,  https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/imageviewer/collections/61463/images/baptisms-0224?usePUB=true&_phsrc=Gnd197&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true&pId=15920; ‘James Harris Phillips’, Burials 1637-1887, Parish of Saint Michael, Barbados, Church Death Records, Findmypast Online Database, https://search.findmypast.co.uk/record/familysearchbrowse?id=https%3a%2f%2ffamilysearch.org%2fark%3a%2f61903%2f3%3a1%3a33s7-9rsr-2s2%3fcc%3d1923399&recordmetadataid=fs_brb_1923399_d_imagepal; ‘Georgiana Philips,’ Baptisms, Parish of Saint Michael, Barbados, 1794, Caribbean Births and Baptisms 1590-1928, film no. 1157925, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/71835:60245?tid=&pid=&queryId=5841d02b0638aef0b1acc7ac943f54a8&_phsrc=Gnd199&_phstart=successSource

[13] ‘John Randal, son of George Phillips,’ transcript of baptisms 1750-1799, register no. 5, Winterbourne Parish Records, Gloucestershire, Frenchay Museum Archives; ‘Ann Graeme Phillips,’ Church of England Baptisms, Winterbourne, Gloucestershire, 1797, Bristol Archives, P.Wi/R/1/e, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/imageviewer/collections/61666/images/47946_302022005560_4109-00021?treeid=&personid=&hintid=&queryId=91770fab5dcd9a5bf6da6c8b003628ba&usePUB=true&_phsrc=Gnd201&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true&pId=2199253; ‘Jane Catherine Phillips,’ Church of England Baptisms, Winterbourne, Gloucestershire, 1800, Bristol Archives, P.Wi/R/1/e, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://search.ancestrylibrary.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=61666&h=2199667&tid=&pid=&queryId=5e63e4211f9c332d8f5dfd513db866e2&usePUB=true&_phsrc=Gnd202&_phstart=successSource

[14] Church Review and Ecclesiastical Register, vol. 12 (Chicago: N.S Richardson Publishing, 1860), 179. As a schoolmaster, George was characterised as having a strong power of influence over his pupils, with ex-pupil Richard Whately regarding that “he brought them to think with him, and to feel with him; to honour whatever he honoured, and to regard as contemptible whatever her despised,” despite the fact that, in his teaching ability, he was “far from eminent.” See Richard Whately, Miscellaneous Remains from the Commonplace Book of Richard Whately, D.D. late Archbishop of Dublin (London: Longman and Co Publishing, 1865), 361-2.

[15] ‘John Randal Phillips,’ UK Articles of Clerkship 1756-1874, Court of Kings Bench: Plea side. Affidavits of the due execution of clerkship, Series 1, KB 105, The National Archives, Kew, UK, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C10047

[16] Note that John’s middle name has been recorded in the baptism record as Randolph, not Randall. ‘John Randolph Phillips,’ Barbados Baptisms, St Michael’s Parish, 4th December 1724, Barbados Archives, RLI/2 1724, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/6253:61463?tid=&pid=&queryId=731b07b05ce7d59588d099f8af76cfd8&_phsrc=Gnd177&_phstart=successSource ; ‘John Randal Phillips,’ ‘Burials,’ Parish of St Michael, 1773, Barbados Church Records, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/141125:9788?tid=&pid=&queryId=a6ef582a5b6057e71f45dc0375ec0557&_phsrc=Gnd180&_phstart=successSource

[17] Chapman and Grundy, ‘Speeches about John Randall Phillips,’ 1.

[18] George Phillips’ Account Book, 1771-1778, Daniel Parsons Collection, Downside Abbey Archives, 1294;

‘John Randal Phillips,’ ‘Burials,’ Parish of St Michael, 1773, Barbados Church Records, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/141125:9788?tid=&pid=&queryId=a6ef582a5b6057e71f45dc0375ec0557&_phsrc=Gnd180&_phstart=successSource

[19] George Phillips’ Account Book, 1771-1778, Daniel Parsons Collection, Downside Abbey Archives, 1294; Diane Brunning, “If you really wish to be a gentleman, it is in your own power to make yourself one,” (MA paper, Bath Spa University, 2016), 1.

[20] George Phillips’ Account Book, 39; Brunning, “If you really wish to be a gentleman, it is in your own power to make yourself one,” 10.

[21] Will of George Phillips of Chiswick, Middlesex, 19 December 1817, PROB 11/1599/284, TNA.

[22] Will of Elizabeth Lovell, Widow of Winterbourne, 12 June 1830, Records of the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, PROB 11/1772/309 The National Archives, Kew, UK; https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D240287. There is some doubt as to whether the funds which John Randal inherited from Elizabeth Lovell originated from the Osbourne family. Her wealth is more likely to have come from her husband’s family than her own; according to her will, the estate of her father, Samuel Osborne, was insufficient to cover his obligations. See ‘Elizabeth Lovell (neé Osborne),’ Legacies of British Slavery Online Database, University College London, https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/person/view/2146654443

[23] Will of George Phillips of Chiswick, PROB 11/1599/284, TNA; ‘John Randal Phillips,’ UK Articles of Clerkship 1756-1874, Court of Kings Bench: Plea side. Affidavits of the due execution of clerkship, Series 1, KB 105, The National Archives, Kew, UK, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C10047

[24] While the Legacies of British Slavery database notes the potential for confusion, as there were at least three ‘John Randal[l] Phillips’ alive during the 1830s, it is clear that the two individuals named John Randal[l] Phillips who made compensation claims and are identified in the Legacies of British Slavery database were George Phillips’ first cousin (‘John Randal Phillips 1760-1845,’ Legacies of British Slavery Online Database, https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/person/view/4660) and a nephew of this John Randal Phillips (‘John Randal Phillips junior, 1800-1837’ Legacies of British Slavery Online Database, https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/person/view/2146631832), not this John Randal Phillips (1795-1852) himself or his grandfather John Randal Phillips (1724-1773). Letter from John Randal Phillips (1800-1837) to Daniel Parsons dated 1st May 1834, ‘Pedigree Parsons’, Daniel Parsons Collection, Downside Abbey Archives, 1294.

[25] George Egerton-Warbuton, King Georges’ Sound, Albany to Emma Egerton Warburton, Chester (transcript from original privately held), 17 April 1841, ‘Egerton-Warburton Family Papers’, J S Battye Library, Acc.1179A, https://catalogue.slwa.wa.gov.au/record=b1679703~S2.

[26] Protector passenger list, State Records Office of Western Australia, Acc. 36/5/89-150, Passengers WA arrivals and departures, produced by Graham Brown for the Swan River Pioneers Special Interest Group of the Western Australian Genealogical Society, Family History WA Online Database, http://data.fhwa.org.au/component/content/article/72-members/358-swan-river-colony-arrivals-and-departures-1829-1838

[27] Protector passenger list, SROWA, Acc. 36/ 5/ 89-36/ 5/ 150, Passengers WA arrivals and departures, Family History WA Online Database, http://data.fhwa.org.au/component/content/article/72-members/358-swan-river-colony-arrivals-and-departures-1829-1838; Chapman and Grundy, ‘Speeches about John Randall Phillips,’ 3; ‘Return of property on which land has been claimed from 01/06/1829-30/06/1830’, State Records Office of Western Australia, Consignment 5000, 683/02.

[28] Return of property on which land has been claimed from 01/06/1829-30/06/1830’, SROWA Cons5000, 683/02.

[29] ‘Return of Lands in Western Australia assigned up to the 20th day of July 1832,’ SROWA Cons5000, 683/03.

[30] John Randall Phillips, The Bicentennial Dictionary of Western Australians, pre-1829–1988, ed. Rica Erickson (Perth: University of Western Australia Press, 1987).

[31] Chapman and Grundy, ‘Speeches about John Randall Phillips,’ 4.

[32] Hobart Town Courier, 7 September 1832, 2.

[33] Chidley Irwin, The State and Position of W.A: The Swan River Settlement (London: Simpkin, Marshall and Co., 1835): 62-3.

[34] Inquirer, 24 Feb 1841, 3.

[35] ‘Sales By Auction,’ Inquirer 15 December 1841, 1.

[36] ‘The Natives!’ Perth Gazette, 15 June 1833, 94; Western Australian Journal, 21 June 1834, 4; Western Australian Journal 4 February 1837, 2.

[37] Chapman and Grundy, ‘Speeches about John Randall Phillips,’ 4-5.

[38] ‘Murder of Thomas and John Velvick by a Party Of Natives’, Perth Gazette, 4 May 1833, 71; ‘The Natives!’, Perth Gazette, 15 June 1833, 94.

[39] ‘Murder of Thomas and John Velvick by a Party of Natives,’ Perth Gazette, 4 May 1833, 1; ‘Two Natives Tried,’ Perth Gazette, 8 April 1837, 3; Ann Curthoys, “The Beginnings of Transportation in Western Australia: Banishment, Forced Labour, and Punishment at the Aboriginal Prison on Rottnest Island before 1850,” Studies in Western Australian History 43, no. 1 (2020): 64.

[40] ‘Murder Committed by Natives,’ Perth Gazette, 20 July 1839, 3.

[41] ‘Native Outrages,’ West Australian, 5 January 1933, 2.

[42] ‘Murder Committed by Natives,’ Perth Gazette, 20 July 1839, 3.

[43] Arnott, Laidlaw and Lydon, “Introduction,” 9.

[44] Perth Gazette, 1 November 1845, 4.

[45] Chapman and Grundy ‘Speeches’, 5–6.

[46] Chapman and Grundy ‘Speeches’, 11.

[47] George Egerton-Warbuton, King Georges’ Sound, Albany to Emma Egerton Warburton, Chester (transcript from original privately held), 17th April 1841, ‘Egerton-Warburton Family Papers’, J S Battye Library, Acc1179A, https://catalogue.slwa.wa.gov.au/record=b1679703~S2; Perth Gazette and Western Australian Journal, 8 November 1845, 4.

[48] ‘Government Gazette,’ Inquirer, 14 July 1847, 2; Inquirer, 19 May 1841, 3.

[49] ‘To Let,’ Perth Gazette, 9 May 1840, 2; ‘A Church’s Centenary,’ Western Mail, 21 October 1948, 11.

[50] Donald Garden, Albany: A Panorama of the Sound from 1829 (West Melbourne: Thomas Nelson Publishing, 1977): 68-9.

[51] John Randall Phillips, WABD.

[52] Protector passenger list, SROWA, Acc. 36/5/89-150, Passengers WA arrivals and departures, Family History WA Online Database,

http://data.fhwa.org.au/component/content/article/72-members/358-swan-river-colony-arrivals-and-departures-1829-1838

[53] John Randall Phillips, WABD.

[54] ‘Phillips, John Randall,’ Albany Deaths and Burials Index, 1816-1991, compiled by Graham Brown for Family History WA, Family History WA Online Database, http://data.fhwa.org.au/members-data/members-only-data/269-albany-deaths-and-burials; ‘John Randall Phillips,’ Find a Grave Online Database, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/231294178/john-randall-phillips

[55] Perth Gazette, 7 January 1853, 2.

[56] South Australian Register, 6 February 1857, 2.

Original Publication

Additional Resources

Citation details

Xavier Reader, Diane Brunning and Jane Lydon, 'Phillips, John Randal (1795–1852)', People Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, https://peopleaustralia.anu.edu.au/biography/phillips-john-randal-33009/text41135, accessed 24 April 2024.

© Copyright People Australia, 2012

Life Summary [details]

Birth

29 September, 1795
Winterbourne, Gloucestershire, England

Death

27 December, 1852 (aged 57)
Albany, Western Australia, Australia

Cause of Death

influenza

Cultural Heritage

Includes subject's nationality; their parents' nationality; the countries in which they spent a significant part of their childhood, and their self-identity.

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