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Henry Pearson (1819–1839)

Henry Pearson (1819-1835) was a passenger on the Neva which left Portsmouth, England, on 8 or 9 December 1834 and then Cork, Ireland, on 5 January 1835 with 148 female convicts, 33 children and twenty free settlers including Henry Pearson who was joining his family in Sydney. The ship was wrecked in Bass Strait on 13th May 1835. Henry was one of the 224 people killed.—

We regret to state that on board the Neva was lost Mr Henry Pearson aged seventeen, son of Mr John Pearson, late linen-draper of this town, and grandson of Stephen Hawkins late of Milton House near Portsmouth. He was going out passenger to Sydney to join his parents when he met with a watery grave.
Southampton Herald (Portsmouth, England), 12 December, 1835

Citation details

'Pearson, Henry (1819–1839)', People Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, https://peopleaustralia.anu.edu.au/biography/pearson-henry-28325/text35987, accessed 14 June 2024.

© Copyright People Australia, 2012

Life Summary [details]

Birth

1819
Portsmouth, Hampshire, England

Death

13 May, 1839 (aged ~ 20)
at sea

Cause of Death

drowned

Cultural Heritage

Includes subject's nationality; their parents' nationality; the countries in which they spent a significant part of their childhood, and their self-identity.

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