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Peter Augustus Latour (1789–1866)

by Jane Lydon and Xavier Reader

This article was published:

Peter Augustus Latour (also Lautour, de Latour) (1789-1866) was among the earliest large-scale investors in the Australian colonies, investing heavily in both Tasmania and the Swan River. Peter was born in India to Joseph Francois Louis Lautour de Quercy (1730-1807) and Anne Hordle (1751-1825).[1] Her had at least six other siblings who survived infancy: Joseph Andrew Lautour (1785-1845), James Oliver Lautour (1790-), Amelia (1808), Georgina (1791-), Barbara (1789-) and Maria (1792).[2]

Peter was descended from a French patrilineal line that Burke’s Peerage described as “highly distinguished.”[3] His father Joseph was born in Strasbourg, Alsace, France, the son of Francois Lautour (1706-1800) and Anna Barbe Ruhn (b.1712), however Joseph migrated to England during early adulthood.[4] Joseph embarked on a successful naval career in the service of His Majesty’s fleet, which included serving as Rear Admiral under Sir Robert Harland in 1777.[5] After leaving the navy, Joseph permanently relocated to Madras (now Chennai), India in 1777, where he worked as an agent, banker and merchant.[6] In Madras, Joseph founded the firm ‘Lautour and Company’ around 1777, and enjoyed great success. Lautour and Company was involved in the cinnamon trade from at least 1803, and also the cotton trade, particularly from the Tinnevelly region brought from Bombay en route for production in China. [7] The Company also acted as correspondents for the firm ‘Coutts and Co’ in addition to financing loans to the British government.[8] During this period, Lautour and Company was considered to rank among the “great mercantile firms of Madras,” and Joseph himself amassed a great fortune from the profits.[9] During the three decades the business remained under his ownership, he was said to have amassed around £100,000.[10]

Joseph married British-born Anne Hordle (1752-1825) on 29 September 1780 at the Fort of St George, Madras. [11] Anne was the daughter of Thomas Hordle (1708-1766) and Mary Cribb (1715-1798).[12] In 1781 and 1783, Anne bore two sons, both named Francis John, but neither survived infancy.[13] Peter’s eldest surviving brother, Joseph Andrew Lautour was born in 1785, and Peter himself was followed by his younger siblings Barbara, James Oliver, Georgina, Maria and Amelia. Peter, along with his siblings, likely spent his early childhood years residing in his father’s house on Charles Street, Fort Saint George, Madras.[14] The residence appears to have been owned by the Lautour family until about 1798, when the building was purchased and repurposed to become the new premises of a court house.[15] In 1805, Joseph (and presumably his family) had returned to England, living at 30 Devonshire Place, Wimpole Street, in the parish of Saint Marylebone.[16] The family continued to reside at 30 Devonshire Place until at least 1810.[17]

Peter entered the army in 1804, aged about sixteen, first serving in the 11th Light Dragoons.[18] He quickly ascended the military ranks, promoted to lieutenant in August of 1805 and to Captain ‘by purchase’ in May 1806.[19] The following year, Peter’s father died.[20]

Following his father’s death, Peter became entitled to income derived from his late father’s numerous estates, however most of his father’s wealth was inherited by the eldest son, Joseph Andrew. [21] During Peter’s early military career, he was noted to have “distinguished himself” in 1811 during his participation in the Battle of El Bodon as part of the Peninsula War.[22] He also saw service during the Battle of Waterloo in 1812, as a member of the 23rd Dragoons, during which he was promoted to command of the entire brigade.[23] He was also present in the capture of Paris.[24] Peter was promoted to Major as part of the 40th Regiment in 1813.[25] The following year, he was registered as a Major of the 23rd Regiment, Light Dragoons; in 1815, Peter’s military service gained the recognition of the Companion of the Order of the Bath award, and he later received a Knighthood of the Royal Hanoverian Guelphic Order; in January 1818, as the military ranks began to reduce, Peter was placed on half pay, and was transferred to General and Colonel-in-Chief of the 3rd Light Dragoons.[26] He appears to have remained a Colonel of the 3rd Light Dragoons for over a decade, until about 1849.[27]

From 1814, Peter had moved from Devonshire Place to his own property of Little Staughton, Bedford, an estate of 475 acres, containing a conservatory, orangery, ice house, plantations, and pleasure garden.[28] In 1819 he purchased an insurance policy from the Royal and Sun Alliance Insurance Group to cover Little Staughton and its contents.[29] He retained the property until his bankruptcy in 1830, when 275 acres of Little Staughton were sold to Henry Hobhouse.[30] Peter had a long-term intimate relationship with Augusta Manners (1786-1824), who bore four children: Louisa Augustus (1811-1853), Amelia (c.1813-1848), Peter Augustus junior (1816-1835), and Henry (1819-1820). [31]

On 23 October 1825, Peter’s mother Anne died at the family home in Devonshire Place. Leaving no will, her effects at the time were valued at less than £1,500 and Peter does not appear to have received any inheritance.[32]

Peter married Una Cameron Barclay Innes (b.1805), of the parish of Saint James, Westminster, in September 1826 in Mary-le-Bone, Middlesex.[33] The union produced at least one child, Une Cameron Barclay Lautour, who was born on 9 June 1832.[34] The marriage was dissolved through divorce after only a few years.[35]

At the time of his marriage Lautour began to invest in the new colonies of Australia. In September 1826, he selected land in Van Diemen’s Land, contributing £25,000, or a quarter of the necessary capital toward the investment.[36] With Captain Bartholemew Boyle Thomas, along with Edward Gibbs, Robert Keats, William Kershaw, and William George Keith Elphinstone, he established ‘The Van Diemen’s Land Establishment’ or ‘The New South Wales and Van Diemen’s Land Establishment’ (later known as the Cressy Horsebreeding Company).[37] The Cressy Company was later joined by Edward Marjoribanks, Latour’s brother-in-law (married to his sister Georgiana).[38] In accordance with the amount of property introduced by the joint venture, they were granted a total of 20,000 acres of land, located “in the Parishes of Cressy, Little Hampton, and Walter, in the County of Westmorland,” strategically situated on the banks of the Macquarie River.[39] Latour and his partners also purchased an additional 1,660 acres, known as ‘Duncan’s Farm’.[40] This land was granted for the purpose of establishing “repositories for the breeding and sale of horses, cows, sheep, and other cattle,” for the cultivation of “waste land”.[41] However, financial troubles plagued Lautour and his partners, who dissolved their partnership in June 1828 by mutual consent.[42]

In 1829 Latour turned his attention to the proposed colony of Swan River where land was initially granted on generous terms of 40 acres for every £3 of investment.[43] His affairs in the colony were managed by his agent Richard Wells.[44] Despite remaining an absentee, Latour was one of the largest investors in the colony, at a total of over £30,000.[45] On the basis of his 1829 investment of £10,483 he was granted 113,100 acres — 26% of all investment in that first year of colonisation.[46] He took up 10,000 acres of this land in the Swan region (5,000 acres on the right bank of the Swan River), 100 acres in the Helena region, and 103,000 acres in the Leschenault district. [47] He brought servants and supplies to the colony on the vessels Calista and Marquis of Anglesea; the Lotus also brought ninety-three indentured servants and their children. The number of servants indentured to Lautour swelled to a total of 234, following the arrivals of the Wanstead, the Protector, and the Britannia.[48]

Latour’s large-scale settlement scheme proved unsustainable. Early difficulties in the colony combined with the loss of provisions when the Marquis of Anglesea was wrecked off the West Australian coast.[49] As early as September 1829, Latour was planning to “dispose of part of the property” he had been entitled to.[50] In June 1830 Wells was writing that they were experiencing a “painful and distressing crisis,” with no provisions, “no money and no immediate means of raising [funds].” Wells and, later, his agent William Shenton, abandoned Lautour’s scheme.[51] Most of Latour’s indentured servants were also released early from their contracts of indenture.[52]

In May 1830 he was declared bankrupt and sentenced to the King’s Bench Prison, where he remained until his creditors provided release warrants in September 1831.[53] It is unclear where the money to release Latour originated from, as both his investments at Swan River and Van Diemen’s Land were unprofitable at the time of his release.[54]

During the 1830s, Latour was continually involved in legal disputes regarding his investments and debts. Chief among these was his case against his brother-in-law Edward Marjoribanks over land holdings of the Cressy Company of Tasmania.[55] Nonetheless Latour remained committed to Swan River, and in 1839 he was preparing to send out further property and settlers to improve his land grants and gain full title, and (unsuccessfully) applied for an extension on the time agreed to improve his grants.[56] In 1840, his land in the Leschenault region was sold to the Western Australian Land Company.[57]

Throughout the 1840s, Latour relocated frequently, including to Boulogne, France, and his movements become difficult to trace, though his numerous court cases related to his bankruptcy and debts continued to follow him.[58] In 1845, his brother Joseph Andrew passed away, his will leaving to his wife all money which was “owing to me at the time of my decease from my brother Peter Augustus Lautour.”[59]

In 1848, Peter was promoted to Major-General on half pay, and was earning a comfortable pension of £400 per year.[60] In the same year, a son Arthur (1838-1878) was born to Peter and his third partner Agnes Marion Skato (1817-1878). By 1865, Peter was living at Staughton Villa, Bromley-common, Bexley, Kent.[61] He died there in January 1866, aged 78, and was buried at Holy Trinity Churchyard, Bromley.[62] At his death, his total effects were valued at under £100 pounds, bequeathed to Agnes and their son Arthur.[63] The town of Longford, Tasmania, was originally named Lautour to commemorate him.[64]

Footnotes
[1] ‘Peter A Lautour,’ Civil Registration Death Index, England and Wales, 1866, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/search/collections/8914/; Will of Joseph Francis Louis Lautour Esquire Commonly Called Francis Lautour, Merchant at Fort Saint George on the Coast of Coromandel in the East Indies of Saint Marylebone, Middlesex, PROB 11/1479/35, The National Archives, UK (TNA), https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D742201; Bernard Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry of Great Britain and Ireland 4th edition, part 2 (London: Harrison Publishing, 1863): 839; ‘Gen Peter Augustus Lautour,’ Grave Record, 11 January 1866, Find a Grave Online Database, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/224094237/peter-augustus-lautour

[2] ‘Joseph Andrew Lautour,’ Baptism, 8 June 1785, Parish Register Transcripts from the Presidency of Madras, Fort St George, British India Office, N22, Family Search Online Database, https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/sources/KVKD-GJJ; ‘Joseph Andrew Lautour of Hexton, Hertfordshire,’ Wills, 1845, PROB11/2019/327, TNA, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D86406; ‘James Oliver Lautour,’ Baptism, 19 January 1790, Parish Register Transcripts from the Presidency of Madras, Fort St George, British India Office, NSS Family Search Online Database, http://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:6VYM-X9XB;‘Amelia Lautour,’ Baptism, 2 February 1808, Parish Register Transcripts from the Presidency of Madras, Madras, British India Office, N22, Family Search Online Database, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FG44-MQM; ‘Georgina Lautour,’ Baptism, 25 December 1791, Parish Register Transcripts from the Presidency of Madras, Fort St George, British India Office, N22, Family Search Online Database, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FGG44-QM6; ‘Barbara Ann Lautour,’ Baptism, 14 January 1789, Parish Register Transcripts from the Presidency of Madras, Fort St George, British India Office, N22, Family Search Online Database, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FG44-3JZ; ‘Maria Frances Geslin Lautour,’ Baptism, 25 December 1792, Parish Register Transcripts from the Presidency of Madras, Fort St George, British India Office, N22, Family Search Online Database, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:6VYM-P384; Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry, 839

[3] Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry, 839.

[4] Will of Joseph Francis Louis Lautour Esquire Commonly Called Francis Lautour, TNA, PROB 11/1479/35; Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry, 839

[5] Julian Cotton, Inscriptions on Tombs or Monuments in Madras: Possessing Historical or Archaeological Interest (Madras: Government Press, 1905), 40.

[6] Henry Love, Vestiges of Old Madras, 1640-1800, volume 3 (London: Asian Educational Services, 1913), 425; ‘Freight to Bengal,’ Madras Courier, 25 June 1806, https://www.tamildigitallibrary.in/admin/assets/periodicals/TVA_PRL_0003187_Madras%20Courier,%20June%2025%20-%201806.pdf, 1.

[7] Colvin de Silva, Ceylon under the British Occupation (Colombo: 1941), 429; ‘Cotton, Tinnevelly, Return to Messrs Lautour and Co. of duty on, imported into Madras and then re-exported and not approved,’ India Office Records and Private Papers, British Library, IOR/Z/E/4/39/C1128, http://searcharchives.bl.uk/permalink/f/79qrt5/IAMS041-001449375; Abbott, Essays in Modern English History, 275.

[8] P. Arbuthnot, Memories of the Arbuthnots of Kincardineshire and Aberdeenshire (London: George Allen & Unwin Publishing Limited, 1920), 339; Amiya Bagchi, “Transition from Indian to British Indian Systems of Money and Banking 1800-1850, Modern Asian Studies 19, no. 3 (1985): 509. Companies such as Lautour and Co. were “houses of agency [which] transacted business of every kind. They advanced money, they bought and sold on commission, they conducted business on their own account.” See Henry Dodwell, The Nabobs of Madras (New Delhi: Asian Educational Services, 1986): 138.

[9] Wilbur Abbott, Essays in Modern English History (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1941), 267. The firm later changed its name from 1803 to reflect the inclusion of its newest member, George Arbuthnot. In 1810, following Joseph’s death in 1807, the firm changed its name again to ‘Messrs Arbuthnot, De Monto & Company’. See Cotton, Inscriptions on Tombs or Monuments in Madras, 207. George Arbuthnot also invested in the slavery business, and is listed in the Legacies of British Slavery database of compensation claims for a small award in Grenada. See ‘George Arbuthnot,’ Legacies of British Slavery Online Database, University College London, https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/person/view/10409

[10] Arbuthnot, Memories of the Arbuthnots of Kincardineshire and Aberdeenshire, 349.

[11] Cotton, Inscriptions on Tombs or Monuments in Madras, 40; Love, Vestiges of Old Madras, 1640-1800, volume 3 (London: Asian Educational Services, 1913), 138 n3.

[12] ‘Anne Hurdle,’ Baptism Register, 1752, England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, Family Search Online Database, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JQNN-RFQ. The Hordles may be related to the Thomas Hordle who had links to British slavery and is identified in the Legacies of British Slavery database, though no link has yet been substantiated. See ‘Thomas Hordle,’ Legacies of British Slavery Database, University College London, https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/person/view/2146643827

[13] Frank Penny, Fort St George, Madras: A Short History of our First Possession in India (London: Swan Sonnenschein & Company Limited, 1900), 211; Cotton, Inscriptions on Tombs or Monuments in Madras, 40.

[14] Penny, Fort St George, Madras: A Short History of our First Possession in India, 211; Cotton, Inscriptions on Tombs or Monuments in Madras, 40.

[15] Love, Vestiges of Old Madras, 475.

[16] Francois Lautour, Land Tax Records, Devonshire Place, London, 1805, London Metropolitan Archives, CLC/B/192/001/MS11936/431/772206, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/13715745:2170?ssrc=pt&tid=19609321&pid=351003635786

[17] ‘Insured: Ann Lautour, 30 Devonshire Place Wimpole Street, Widow,’ 12 Jan 1810, London Metropolitan Archives, CLC/B/192/F/MS11936/453/839920, https://search.lma.gov.uk/SCRIPTS/MWIMAIN.DLL/382878323/2/3/2620159

[18] Sylvanus Urban, The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review, vol 220, (London: Bradbury, Evans and Company, 1866), 298; Pamela Statham, “Peter Augustus Lautour: Absentee Investor Extraordinaire,” Journal of the Royal West Australian Historical Society 72, no. 3 (1986): 228. Peter’s brother James Oliver also entered the army, though he died during service in 1813. See Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 228.

[19] Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 228. The frequency of Peter’s military promotions aroused Statham’s suspicion, and she noted that his appointments from the Duke of York were made at a time when the Duke was subject to an inquiry regarding the legitimacy of his promotions.

[20] Will of Joseph Francis Louis Lautour Esquire Commonly Called Francis Lautour, PROB 11/1479/35, TNA UK, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D742201

[21] ‘Release and Conveyance of the Equity of Redemption of Freehold hereditaments situated in Little Staughton, late property of Colonel Lautour,’ X163/124, Bedfordshire Archives, https://bedsarchivescat.bedford.gov.uk/Details/archive/110516116 . In turn, Joseph Andrew, upon his own passing in 1845, passed all that he was entitled to “by virtue of the last will and testament of my said late father” onto his own wife and children. See Joseph Andrew Lautour of Hexton, Hertfordshire,’ Wills, 1845, PROB11/2019/327, TNA, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D86406

[22] ‘23rd Regiment of Light Dragoons,’ in Charles Dalton, The Waterloo Roll Call: With Biographical Notes and Anecdotes, 2nd edition (London: Eyre and Spottiswoode Publishing, 1904); Urban, The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review, 298.

[23] ‘PA Latour,’ Major, Muster Roll Waterloo Men, 23rd Light Dragoons, War Office: Campaign Medal and Award Rolls, WO100, piece 14, National Archives UK, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C14308

[24] Dalton, The Waterloo Roll Call; Urban, The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review, 298.

[25] Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 229

[26] Dalton, The Waterloo Roll Call; Urban, The Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review, 298.

[27] Hector Bolitho, The Galloping Third: The Story of the 3rd The King’s Own Hussars (John Murray Publishing, 1963): 177.

[28] Brenda Foster and Jeanette Atkinson, ‘Little Staughton Park Estate,’ Bedfordshire Archives, https://bedsarchives.bedford.gov.uk/CommunityHistories/Little-Staughton/Little-Staughton-Park-Estate.aspx

[29] ‘Insured: Colonel Peter Augustus Lautour, Little Slaughter Bedfordshire,’ 1 Dec 1819, CLC/B/192/001/MS11936/482/960386, https://search.lma.gov.uk/SCRIPTS/MWIMAIN.DLL/382878323/2/4/2954995

[30] Foster and Atkinson, ‘Little Staughton Park Estate,’ Bedfordshire Archives, https://bedsarchives.bedford.gov.uk/CommunityHistories/Little-Staughton/Little-Staughton-Park-Estate.aspx

[31] Foster and Atkinson, ‘Little Staughton Park Estate,’ Bedfordshire Archives, https://bedsarchives.bedford.gov.uk/CommunityHistories/Little-Staughton/Little-Staughton-Park-Estate.aspx Few further details exist of Peter’s partnership to Augusta Manners or their shared children.

[32] Ann Lautour,’ National Probate Calendar of England and Wales, Wills and Administrations, 1859, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/16622403:1904?ssrc=pt&tid=19609321&pid=351003636076

[33] Marriages in the Parish of St Mary-le-Bone, Middlesex, 1826, London Church of England Parish Registers, London Metropolitan Archives, P89/MRY/1/186, accessed through Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/discoveryui-content/view/5765717:1623?ssrc=pt&tid=12336139&pid=310014735109; Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 229; Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry, 839

[34] ‘Une Cameron Barclay,’ Baptism Record, 1832, Foreign Registers and Returns of British Subjects, RG33, PRO57/5900, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C10828850

[35] ‘Peter Augustus Lautour and Une Cameron Barclay Lautour,’ Divorce Court File, J77/32/L24, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C7972021; Foster and Atkinson, ‘Little Staughton Park Estate,’ Bedfordshire Archives, https://bedsarchives.bedford.gov.uk/CommunityHistories/Little-Staughton/Little-Staughton-Park-Estate.aspx

[36] Hobart Town Advertiser, 30 April 1841, 1; Sydney Morning Herald, 16 October 1848, 2; Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 229. Lautour’s investment was mainly spent on livestock procured through agents Marjoribanks and Co.: Sydney Morning Herald, 16 October 1848, 2.

[37] Colonial Times, 15 August 1828, 2; Sydney Morning Herald, 16 October 1848, 2; Hobart Town Gazette, 17 May 1828, 2; Hobart Town Advertiser, 30 April 1841, 1; Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 229. Note: there is potential confusion between Lautour’s Van Diemen’s Land Establishment and the Van Diemen’s Land Company, the latter formed in 1824 and remaining in operation today. Ian Pearce, ‘The Record of the Van Diemen’s Land Company,’ Archives and Manuscripts: Journal of the Australian Society of Archivists 3, no. 2 (1966): 7.

[38] Sydney Morning Herald, 16 October 1848, 2; The Austral-Asiatic Review, Tasmanian and Australian Advertiser, 24 December 1839, 3. Edward Marjoribanks also appears in the Legacies of British Slavery database, for an (unsuccessful) counterclaim on the Good Hope Estate in Trinidad. See ‘Edward Marjoribanks,’ Legacies of British Slavery Database, University College London, https://www.ucl.ac.uk/lbs/person/view/-899213097

[39] The Austral-Asiatic Review, Tasmanian and Australian Advertiser, 24 December 1839, 3; Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 229

[40] Sydney Morning Herald, 16 October 1848, 2; Hobart Town Advertiser, 30 April 1841, 1; The Austral-Asiatic Review, Tasmanian and Australian Advertiser, 24 December 1839, 3.

[41] Sydney Morning Herald, 16 October 1848, 2

[42] Colonial Times, 15 August 1828. However the Cressy Company remained subject to a case in the Court of Chancery for a further two decades. See Geelong Advertiser, 21 May 1850, 1.

[43] State Records Office of Western Australia (SROWA), cons36/2/184; 36/8/163 and 36/8/164.  Initially, Lautour applied for land under the ‘old’ terms of granting land in 1828, which allowed 21 years, not 10 years, for land to be sufficiently improved in order to gain its full title.

[44] ‘Amended Bill of Complaint,’ in Settlement in Western Australia: Latour v. Attorney-General, 12 July 1864, TNA, TS 18/101, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C5895902, 4-6.

[45] Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, 22 August 1874; Peter Augustus Latour (Lautour), Western Australian Bicentennial Dictionary (WABD) pre-1829-1988, ed. Rica Erickson (Perth: University of Western Australia Press, 1987; Statham, “Absentee Investor Extraordinaire,”; ‘Amended Bill of Complaint,’ in Settlement in Western Australia: Latour v. Attorney-General, 12 July 1864, TNA, TS 18/101, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C5895902, 4-6.

[46] “Return of Lands in Western Australia assigned up to the 20th day of July 1832,” SROWA, cons5000/683/1-13, 164; “Return of property on which land has been claimed from 01/06/1829-30/06/1830,” SROWA, cons5000/683/1-13. See also cons36/25/99 (dated 1832)

[47] ‘Application for Col. Lautour’s 5000 acres on the right bank Swan R, if resumed,’ in Pamela Statham-Drew papers, MSS, Acc 9631A, State Library of Western Australia. On General Lautour’s Land Claims in Western Australia. Lautour’s 100 acres in the Helena region was later transferred to William Shenton, 5,000 acres of the 10,000 acres on the Swan to Smithers and Dring, and the remaining 5,000 to Jas. W. Wright.

[48] Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 231; “Return of property on which land has been claimed from 01/06/1829-30/06/1830,” SROWA, cons5000, 683/1-13; SROWA, cons5000/657; ‘Amended Bill of Complaint,’ in Settlement in Western Australia: Latour v. Attorney-General, 12 July 1864, TNA, TS 18/101, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C5895902, 4-6 ; Wanstead, Protector and Brittania passenger lists, State Records Office of Western Australia, consignment 5000, accession no. 36/6/2-3, Western Australia Passenger Arrivals and Departures – Swan River Colony 1826-1838, produced by Graham Brown for the Swan River Pioneers Special Interest Group of the Western Australian Genealogical Society, Family History WA Online Database, http://data.fhwa.org.au/component/content/article/72-members/358-swan-river-colony-arrivals-and-departures-1829-1838

[49] ‘Swan River,’ Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, 5 December 1829, 2; Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 231.

[50] SROWA, cons36/8/172.

[51] Richard Wells to Peter Augustus Latour, 10 June 1830, SLWA, Statham-Drew papers, 8923A/2; Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 233-4.

[52] SROWA, cons36/7/58; 36/7/59; 36/7/63; 36/8/2; 36/10/17.

[53] Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 234.

[54] Sydney Morning Herald, 16 October 1848, 2; Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 234

[55] Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Landed Gentry, 839; Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 235; Brenda Foster and Jeanette Atkinson, ‘Little Staughton Park Estate,’ Bedfordshire Archives, https://bedsarchives.bedford.gov.uk/CommunityHistories/Little-Staughton/Little-Staughton-Park-Estate.aspx

[56] ‘Amended Bill of Complaint,’ in Settlement in Western Australia: Latour v. Attorney-General, 12 July 1864, TNA, TS 18/101, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C5895902, 12, 13.

[57] Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 236

[58] Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 235

[59] ‘Joseph Andrew Lautour of Hexton, Hertfordshire,’ Wills, 1845, PROB11/2019/327, TNA, https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D86406

[60] Courier, 12 April 1848, 2; Statham, “Investor Extraordinaire,” 237

[61] ‘Peter Augustus Lautour,’ Electoral Register, Bromley District, Parish of Bromley, West Kent, England, 1865, Bexley Archives, accessed through Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/imageviewer/collections/61151/images/45930_263021009499_0246-00090?pId=797657

[62] ‘Peter A Lautour,’ Civil Registration Death Index, England and Wales, 1866, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/search/collections/8914/; ‘Peter Augustus Lautour,’ National Probate Calendar, Wills, 1866, p.185, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/imageviewer/collections/1904/images/31874_222365-00192?pId=3182317; ‘Gen Peter Augustus Lautour,’ Grave Record, 11 January 1866, Find a Grave Online Database, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/224094237/peter-augustus-lautour

[63] ‘Peter Augustus Lautour,’ National Probate Calendar, Wills, proved 31 May 1866, p.185, Ancestry.com Online Database, https://www.ancestrylibrary.com.au/imageviewer/collections/1904/images/31874_222365-00192?pId=3182317

[64] Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser, 22 August 1874

Original Publication

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Citation details

Jane Lydon and Xavier Reader, 'Latour, Peter Augustus (1789–1866)', People Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, https://peopleaustralia.anu.edu.au/biography/latour-peter-augustus-33759/text42256, accessed 23 May 2024.

© Copyright People Australia, 2012

Life Summary [details]

Alternative Names
  • Lautour, Peter Augustus
  • de Latour, Peter Augustus
Birth

1789
India

Death

11 January, 1866 (aged ~ 77)
Bexley, Kent, England

Cultural Heritage

Includes subject's nationality; their parents' nationality; the countries in which they spent a significant part of their childhood, and their self-identity.

Religious Influence

Includes the religion in which subjects were raised, have chosen themselves, attendance at religious schools and/or religious funeral rites; Atheism and Agnosticism have been included.

Occupation
Awards
Key Organisations