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Philip Acland Jacobs (1873–1963)

Philip Jacobs, n.d.

Philip Jacobs, n.d.

photo supplied by family

Notes taken from his autobiography, A Lawyer Tells (F. W. Cheshire, Melbourne) published in 1949.

p 2 His second name, Acland, is derived from Acland St in St Kilda. His parents were living in a house in the street at the time of his birth.

p 5 The family went to England in 1882 aboard the Sorata.

p 17 Philip returned to Australia at the age of 15.

p 34 While a student at Ormond College he wrote under the nom de plume 'Calamus'.

p 40 He was a law reporter for the Argus newspaper and the Argus Law Reports from 1895 to 1900.

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Citation details

'Jacobs, Philip Acland (1873–1963)', People Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, https://peopleaustralia.anu.edu.au/biography/jacobs-philip-acland-20179/text31787, accessed 19 April 2024.

© Copyright People Australia, 2012

Philip Jacobs, n.d.

Philip Jacobs, n.d.

photo supplied by family

Life Summary [details]

Alternative Names
  • Calamus
Birth

18 January, 1873
St Kilda, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Death

4 September, 1963 (aged 90)
Box Hill, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Cause of Death

heart disease

Cultural Heritage

Includes subject's nationality; their parents' nationality; the countries in which they spent a significant part of their childhood, and their self-identity.

Religious Influence

Includes the religion in which subjects were raised, have chosen themselves, attendance at religious schools and/or religious funeral rites; Atheism and Agnosticism have been included.

Education
Occupation
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