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Dalton, John James (1846–1909)

John James Dalton (1846-1909)

Born: 2 June 1846 at Mulgoa, New South Wales. Married: (1) Mary Gray on 3 November 1878 at Grenfell, New South Wales. They had six children. (2) Maud ..., an Aboriginal woman, on 4 April 1905 at Bouila, Queensland. Died: 13 October 1909 at Five Mile Well, Chatwsorth, Queensland. Religion: Catholic.

  • in 1863 was charged with stealing a gun from William Lee. According to Goulburn gaol entrance book he was 5 feet 7½ inches tall, with a slight stature, fair complexion, flaxen hair and blue eyes. He couldn't read or write.
  • in 1871 was sought by police for stealing a number of items from George Gray (his future father-in-law?), including a bullock and horse.
  • occupation was given as labourer in marriage and death certificates.

Additional Resources

Citation details

'Dalton, John James (1846–1909)', People Australia, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, https://peopleaustralia.anu.edu.au/biography/dalton-john-james-32750/text40717, accessed 6 December 2022.

© Copyright People Australia, 2012

Life Summary [details]

Birth

2 June, 1846
Mulgoa, New South Wales, Australia

Death

13 October, 1909 (aged 63)
Chatsworth, Queensland, Australia

Cause of Death

heart disease

Cultural Heritage
Occupation